Arthramid

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Hi there
I have a 10 year old Labrador.
Does Arthramid works for OA? How?
Thanks
Liz

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Hi Liz, I work with the manufacturer of Arthramid.
Unfortunately the answer is not straight forward. I cannot say if it would work with you dog without knowing a few more details. Please ask your vet to send me the case details greg@nupsala.com
Arthramid is an injectable scaffold which is used by the synovial tissue/ joint capsule to recover from the affect of OA. Helping the synovial tissue in turn helps the quality of synovial fluid, a key component in managing OA.
A single injection can last from several months to 2 yrs.
Regards
Greg McGarrell

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Hi Greg
Thanks, great feedback, Arthramid sounds interesting!
I will ask for the clinical file to be sent to you to determine how Arthramid will benefit her OA. My dog’s knee joint and fluid are in poor condition. It sounds like a good idea to treat the synovial tissue with this injectable product.
Where is Arthramid/Aquamid injectable available for my vet?
Thank you
Regards
Liz

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ok so I think that Arthramid is now called Aquamid for licensing reasons.
from the Aquamid website
Aquamid Reconstruction (AR) is a polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) which is a non-degradable, highly visco-elastic synthetic gel, which is atoxic with durable effect and tissue-compatibility and well tolerated by mammal tissue by allowing in vivo vessel and fibrous in-growth. Experimental studies supported by histopathological observations have shown that AR exerts its effect via integration over time within the soft tissues, through a combination of vessel in-growth and molecular water exchange. Intra-articular injection of AR is expected to provide permanent pain relief and improve the functional ability through a cushioning or padding effect on the joint and thereby reduce symptoms and improve patients’ quality of life.

From the little that I know…. and I have asked others more knowledgebale to comment … is that it is non inflamatory  and quite safe as long as administered aseptically. Some people are injecting it with triamcinolone a short acting steroid to ensure the invasive nature of the injection has limited reaction.
I have heard and seen great response but I have also heard some have had less response, but i have not heard of deleterious results

xx

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Hi Liz
I dont have any personal experience with arthamid and so have asked my CAM colleagues if they have and hope to have an answer here for you shortly
Best Wishes
Carly

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